Fun with Words and NaNoWriMo

In the spirit of NaNoWriMo, aka National Novel Writing Month, which you can find a link to here, I wrote a poem each time I finished my daily word count.

The first three were influenced by the contemporary experimental poet Bob Perelman. His poem “Chronic Meanings” he wrote for Lee Hickman, when he found out that Hickman was dying of AIDS. He used cut-off sentences which allow readers to participate in making the meaning. It’s a form that Perelman used to address his feelings for Hickman before his death which he felt was cutting his life too short.

I am writing cut-off sentences as I want readers to fill in their own blanks as I try to sum up what I’ve written for the day for NaNoWriMo, not wanting to tell readers what my novel is about, but rather to let them fill in the unfinished sentences, leaving the meaning open to them.

I’m also writing at the time when I’m disturbed by the repetitive and negative influences from the Canadian media about people who have fallen from grace or who have fallen and never gotten back up again and never will.

I used the hashtags NaNoWriMo and then found out that the hashtag NaBloPoMo was used for those who blogged or wrote poetry during NaNoWriMo. There’s a hashtag for just about everything.

NaBloPoMoOneNaBloPoMoTwoNaBloPoMo

The fourth tweet is influenced by aleatory poet John Cage, who writes mesostic poetry where one word runs through a poem in the centre. The first word in my tweet if read with the capital “W” in the centre (Twitter wouldn’t allow me to centre the first word, so I did my best) will allow you to read one word vertically. I borrowed from one of my previous stanzas to construct a poem that lacks sentimentality and is minimalist. Perfect for me to hint at what is going into my novel perhaps.

NaBloPoMoFour

I can’t state whether or not I have done any justice to the poets or their poetry. This is merely me having fun with my words, like the poets themselves, along with being strongly influenced by the poetry that I’m continuing to learn about in Modern American and Contemporary Poetry aka ModPo through Coursera.

And it’s a nice way for me to end my day after reaching my word count.

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